Posted in Worldview Analysis

10 Reasons why being Short, Black, Female, Pretty, and Athletic are Examples of ‘Privilege’ – The American Vision

Liberals have developed dozens of terms to position their ideological brand and subvert their ideological enemies. Here are more than 20 of them:
Tolerance, choice, safe space, micro-aggression, gender fluidity, gender reassignment, multiculturalism, diversity, fairness, inclusion, empowerment, global cooling, global warming, climate change, climate change deniers, hate speech, dreamers, paying your fair share, wealth redistribution, progressive, homophobia, Islamophobia, world community, wetlands (swamps).
One of the more recent ones is “white privilege.
— Read on americanvision.org/posts/10-reasons-why-being-short-black-female-pretty-and-athletic-are-examples-of-privilege/

Absolutely loved this! Deals with a serious matter that has been rammed down the American populace’s throat in a satirical way. Enjoy.

Posted in Beliefs

To whom will we be in bondage? – The American Vision

The Bible is clear: God’s image-bearers can only attain lasting freedom when they are in bondage to Jesus Christ and His commandments which are not burdensome. We are bondservants by nature as creatures. The only question is: To whom will we be in bondage? To be outside of Christ is to be in slavery. The world today is outside of Christ, and never has slavery been more widespread or more scientific.
— Read on americanvision.org/posts/to-whom-will-we-be-in-bondage/

Posted in Grace

In Spite of Our Sin: God’s Graciousness through Christ Jesus to All

Many are familiar with the following biblical text:

“For God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten [i.e., unique; one and only] Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life.”

John 3:16; KJV

The phrase “so loved the world” raises the question of who or what? Does the phrase mean all mankind? If so, then in what sense? Or does the phrase refer to the whole created order; in other words, all the earth and those things contained therein? Again, if so, then in what sense?

In the general sense I believe that the phrase refers to all creation. God created all things in six days (approx. 24-hour periods of time; YOM), and His evaluation of His creation is that it was “very good.” There is no question that the sin of His creatures marred it, but in the sense of consequential cursing. In God’s judgment of His fallen creatures, He removed a portion of the blessing He had bestowed in order to all suffering and pain and death to be the burden to be bore by His representatives.

This does not mean that creation became evil. The grass of the field is not evil. The warming rays of the sun is not evil. But the intention of man’s heart is. The experience of thorns and thistles, of disease and death is; in the sense of being a reminder of what was lost in the garden. A constant ringing in our ears that we are not God and our will in opposition against His is unholy and unrighteous. The exclamation point on this reality is this… “we all die.” We are not self-sustaining for we are, by nature, finite.

The verse above is a reminder of that truth. Apart from God we perish. But if our faith rests in Him alone, then we shall live. And yet, God is still gracious because of Christ Jesus to all the earth regardless. Something Dr. Gary North does an apt job explaining to his readers,

“His Son’s representative death is the basis of all God’s gifts to mankind in history. Grace is an unearned gift, meaning a gift earned by Christ at Calvary and given by God to all men in history. Christ’s restitution payment serves as the basis of common grace to covenant-breakers in history and special grace to covenant-keepers in history and eternity. The words of Christ on the cross are the basis of common grace in history: ‘Then said Jesus, Father, forgive them; for they know not what they do’ (Luke 23.34). Ignorance of the law is no excuse, but Jesus Christ grants grace to the ignorant anyway. He paid God’s price; He suffered God’s sanctions; so He has the right to grant temporal (common) forgiveness on no terms at all, and eternal (special) forgiveness on His own terms.”1

Gary North, Tools of Dominion, 286-7

1Gary North, Tools of Dominion: The Case Laws of Exodus (Tyler, TX: Institute for Christian Economics, 1990), 286-287, PDF e-book. Emphasis in italics in original.

Posted in Biblical Questions

Questions about True Victims and the Immaturity of a People to Recognize the Difference

“And the Lord God commanded the man, saying, ‘You may surely eat of every tree of the garden, but of the tree of knowledge of good and evil you shall not eat, for in the day that you eat of it you shall surely die.'”

Gen 2:16-17; ESV

When I served as youth leader I was often asked questions about the beginning. This makes sense since such questions pertain to much of the substance and meaning of life: Why am I here? What purpose do I have for living? Am I an accident that slowly came out of a primordial soup, like biological evolutionist’s teaching in school? Am I just an animal, then? What happens when we die, is that it or is there something else?

Another question that was sometimes hurled at me was this: “Why were Adam and Eve told that they would die if they ate the fruit from the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil?”

A related question that followed was, “Why do I suffer the consequence (sinful nature) of their sin?”

Good questions. These are the sorts of things that kids should be asking mom’s and dad’s everywhere. And, they should be the sort of questions that mom’s and dad’s ought to jump at answering. I know, I know not many parents teach their kids these things nowadays. Not many parents read to their children or teach their kids to pray, thanking God for the many blessings we receive each day throughout out lives.

What I would like to do today is offer a short answer to the underlying problem of the question proposed by children (and adults) regarding the eating of the forbidden fruit in the garden of Eden, in the beginning.

“I thought you said it was a ‘good question,’ ‘the [sort] of things that kids should be asking…? So then, how can you say that there is an underlying problem with the question?” you ask. Very good. I’m glad that you were paying attention. Here’s the problem.

Who are the supposed victims when the question is being asked? God or mankind? When the punishment/consequence of the eating of the forbidden fruit is challenged it is on the grounds that “dying” is far too harsh. “All they did was eat a piece of fruit!”

Were they warned ahead of time of the punishment/consequence to follow if they did so? Yes, they were. “But dying! But passing on that death sentence to their children after them (an inherited sin nature)! That seems too radical!”

It does, why? You see, the supposition is that mankind (male and female; Adam and Eve) are the real victims here. But, they are the one’s who committed a transgression against a known law. If they are punished for violating the law, then why assume that they are victims? Bear in mind that this mentality has deeply seated itself into the very fabric of our society. The idea that a just punishment for a crime is too harsh, too inhumane is to make a victim out of the perpetrator.

I have heard this argument used time and time again in defense of those who break the law. We see those that show little regard for righteousness as somehow the victims of the system of law. This reveals, to me, the immaturity of our society at large. Our society thinks more like a child, than an adult.

Just in case you didn’t know the real victim in the garden when Adam and Eve decided to eat the forbidden fruit, was not the man and woman who were held accountable for their crimes against their Maker. The true victim was God their Creator. He gave them life. He gave them all that He had created. All He required is that they respect and love Him in honoring His Word. They refused. They spit in His face. They chose to rebel against Him and attempted to strike their Father in the face. The true victim in that act of eating the forbidden fruit was the Holy God whose word was violated, not the man and woman who treated Him so lightly.

The punishment was, therefore, just. Justice served from a righteous King. It really is too bad that so many in our world today fail to recognize true justice, true victims, true violations of the law, but can we expect anything less from a people who have been indoctrinated with lies. A nation who does not know its left hand from its right? Sadly, I think not.